Food combinations bad for digestion

Five faulty food combinations – 

Animal protein and carbohydrates: Different enzymes are required to breakdown these very different foods. When eaten together, the foods do not get properly digested. That leads to indigestion, fermentation and putrefaction in the digestive tract.

Fruit with carbohydrates: Fruit digests much more quickly than any other food. Many people think that adding fruit to porridge is a healthy breakfast option. However, it will only hinder the digestive process. It’s better to always eat fruit on an empty stomach and ideally early in the morning.



Dairy with fruit: Smoothies are a breakfast favourite for many people. The problem is that yogurt is an animal protein and when mixed with fruit, it can cause inadequate digestion which leads to acidity, and fermentation in the GI tract.

 


Avoid drinking with meals: It’s best to avoid drinking large amounts of any fluid with meals, otherwise the digestive enzymes will become diluted and hinder the digestive process. It’s best to stop drinking 30 minutes before food intake and wait two hours after eating before drinking water, to ensure adequate digestion.

 


Melon after dinner for a healthy dessert: Melon is the one fruit that must be eaten alone, or left alone, as it takes slightly longer than other fruits to digest.


Five useful food combinations – 

* Carbohydrates and vegetables such as brown rice and vegetables.

* Animal protein and non-starchy vegetables make for easy digestion, which will enhance one’s ability to breakdown the nutrients and eliminate efficiently. Prawns on a bed of green leaves with cucumber and fennel or grilled fish with lightly steamed green beans.

* Bowl of seasonal fruit salad first thing in the morning. This is a gentle way to wake up the system.

* Avocados combine well with either vegetables or fruits. This semi tropical fruit also works well in green smoothies and makes a great dairy replacement.

* Aim to ingest denser proteins, especially animal-based ones earlier in the day to ensure adequate digestion. 
 

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High Cholesterol: A Serious Health Risk

You may wonder whether something like cholesterol which is so common can really be a serious health risk. The truth is: Absolutely. Your body makes cholesterol, and you also get it when you eat eggs, meats, and dairy products. When you have more than your body needs, cholesterol can cause plaque to build up in your arteries. This thick, hard plaque can clog your arteries like a blocked pipe. Reduced blood flow can lead to a stroke or heart attack.

How High Cholesterol Causes Heart Attack:

If there is a clog in a coronary artery, your heart gets too little blood and oxygen. Without enough oxygen, your heart becomes weak and damaged. If the plaque breaks open, a blood clot may form on top of the buildup, further blocking blood flow. Or, a blood clot can break off and flow to an artery in another part of the body. If a clot completely blocks an artery feeding your heart, you have a heart attack.

How High Cholesterol Causes Stroke:

Plaque buildup can also keep your brain from getting enough blood and oxygen. If a clot completely blocks an artery feeding your brain, you have a stroke.

A Problem Without Symptoms

Despite the risks, about 1 in 3 Americans have not had their cholesterol tested in the past 5 years. That’s how often the American Heart Association recommends screening.

Sperling says high cholesterol may not worry you enough because:

It doesn’t cause symptoms. So you don’t know you have it unless you get a blood cholesterol test.

It doesn’t cause pain. So you may be less likely to seek treatment or keep taking your cholesterol-lowering medicine.

“It’s not like taking a painkiller for an aching knee, where you know it’s working,” he says.

Plus, the risks from high cholesterol aren’t immediate. The damage accumulates over years — even decades. High cholesterol in your 20s and 30s can take its toll in your 50s and 60s. Because the effects take time, you may not feel the urgency to treat it. You may think you can deal with it later – but you may wait too long.

“Having high cholesterol may not hurt you today or tomorrow,” Sperling says. “But if you don’t do something about it, it can have a terrible cost down the road.”

Protect Yourself

You can outsmart high cholesterol. Eat a healthy diet, exercise, and take medicine as your doctor recommends to lower your levels.

The first step: Ask your doctor if it’s time for you to have a fasting cholesterol blood test. If they’re high, ask your doctor what numbers are ideal for you based on your personal health and risk factors. Also ask how often you need the test.

Most people should have:

LDL, “bad” cholesterol, less than 100 mg/dL.  If you already have heart disease, you may need to aim for under 70 mg/dL.

HDL, “good” cholesterol, 60 mg/dL or higher

Triglycerides, another type of risky fat in your bloodstream, less than 150 mg/dL

Whatever you do, don’t ignore your high cholesterol risks.