Avoid Instant Noodles

1. Nutrient Absorption : Noodles inhibit the absorption of nutrients for the children under 5.

2. Cancer Causing : The ingredient in the instant noodles called “Styrofoam’, Which is a cancer causing agent.

3. Miscarriage : Women who are Eating instant noodles during their pregnancy causes miscarriage, because it affect the development of a fetus.

4. Junk Food : instant noodles are enriched with full of carbohydrates, but no vitamins, fiber and minerals. This makes the instant noodles considered as a junk food.

5. Sodium : Instant noodles are power packed with high amounts of sodium. Excess consumption of sodium leads to heart disease, stroke, hypertension and kidney damage.

6. MSG : Monosodium Glutamate is used to enhance the flavour of instant noodles. People who are allergic to MSG consume it as part of their diet, then they end up suffering from headaches, facial flushing, pain, burning sensations.

7. Overweight : Eating Noodles is the leading cause of obesity. Noodles contains fat & large amounts of sodium, which causes water retention in the body and surely it leads to overweight.

8. Digestion : Instant noodles are bad for digestive system. Regular consumption of instant noodles causes irregular bowl movements and bloating.

9. Propylene Glycol : The ingredient in the instant noodles called “Propylene Glycol” which has a anti-freeze property. This ingredient is used because it prevents the noodles from drying by retaining moisture. It weakens the immune system of our body. It is easily absorbed by the body and it accumulates in the kidneys, heart and liver. It causes abnormalities and damage to those areas.

10. Metabolism : Regular consumption of instant noodles affect the body’s metabolism, because of the chemical substances like additives, coloring and preservatives inside the noodles.

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How to Improve Immunity Naturally?

Yes, it is that time of the year again – peak season for the common cold and the influenza virus.  More people contract the flu and other devastating colds between now and the end of the winter than any other time of the year.

Fortunately for you, there are ways you can fight back.  By modifying, adding, and subtracting from your diet, you can help boost your immune system and ability to resist infection.  Adequately feeding your immune system boosts its fighting power. Immune boosters work in many ways. They increase the number of white cells in the immune system army, train them to fight better, and help them form an overall better battle plan. Boosters also help to eliminate the deadwood in the army, substances that drag the body down. Here are the top eight nutrients to add to your family’s diet to cut down on days missed from work and school because of illness.

 1. Vitamin C. Vitamin C tops the list of immune boosters for many reasons. There has been more research about the immune-boosting effects of Vitamin C than perhaps any other nutrient. Vitamin C supplements are inexpensive to produce, and it’s available naturally in many fruits and vegetables (citrus fruits, strawberries, bell peppers and tomatoes to mention a few).

 Here’s what the research shows about how this mighty vitamin protects your body.

• Promotes wound healing.

• Commonly used for supporting immune function and protection from viral disease and cancer.

• It may also help in people with high cholesterol, cataracts, diabetes, allergies and asthma, and periodontal disease.

• As an antioxidant, it protects blood vessels and the lenses in your eyes, and helps keep body tissues strong.

• Popular for warding off and shortening the unpleasant effects of the common cold.

 

2. Vitamin E. This important antioxidant and immune booster doesn’t get as much press as vitamin C, yet it’s important to a healthy immune system. It’s not difficult to get 30 to 60 milligrams every day of Vitamin E from a diet rich in seeds, vegetable oils, and grains, but it’s difficult for most people to consume more than 60 milligrams a day consistently through diet alone. 

Supplements may be necessary to get enough vitamin E to boost your immune system.  People who don’t exercise, who smoke, and who consume high amounts of alcoholic beverages will need the higher dosage. Those with a more moderate lifestyle can get by with lower levels of supplementation.

 3. Carotenoids. Beta carotene increases the number of infection-fighting cells, natural killer cells, and helper T-cells, as well as being a powerful antioxidant that mops up excess free radicals that accelerate aging.

Like the other “big three” antioxidants, vitamins C and E, it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by interfering with how the fats and cholesterol in the bloodstream oxidize to form arterial plaques. Carotenoids can be found in Sweet Potatoes, Kale, Carrots, Spinach, Collards, Lettuce, and Turnips.

4. Bioflavonoids. A group of phytonutrients called bioflavonoids aids the immune system by protecting the cells of the body against environmental pollutants. Bioflavonoids protect the cell membranes against the pollutants trying to attach to them.

Along the membrane of each cell there are microscopic parking spaces, called receptor sites. Pollutants, toxins, or germs can park here and gradually eat their way into the membrane of the cell, but when bioflavonoids fill up these parking spots there is no room for toxins to park. Good sources of bioflavonoids are Red Bell Peppers, Strawberries, Oranges, and Broccoli.

5. Zinc. This valuable mineral increases the production of white blood cells that fight infection and helps them fight more aggressively. It also increases killer cells that fight against cancer and helps white cells release more antibodies.

Zinc supplements have been shown to slow the growth of cancer.   Zinc increases the number of infection-fighting T-cells, especially in elderly people who are often deficient in zinc, and whose immune system often weakens with age. Eat some Oysters, fortified cereals, crab, beef, turkey or beans.

 

6. Garlic. This flavorful member of the onion family is a powerful immune booster that stimulates the multiplication of infection-fighting white cells, boosts natural killer cell activity, and increases the efficiency of antibody production.

The immune-boosting properties of garlic seem to be due to its sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin and sulfides. Garlic can also act as an antioxidant that reduces the build-up of free radicals in the bloodstream.

 

7. Selenium. This mineral increases natural killer cells and mobilizes cancer-fighting cells.

Best food sources of selenium are tuna, red snapper, lobster, shrimp, whole grains, vegetables (depending on the selenium content of the soil they’re grown in), brown rice, egg yolks, cottage cheese, chicken (white meat), sunflower seeds, garlic, Brazil nuts, and lamb chops.

8. Omega-3 fatty acids. A study found that children taking a half teaspoon of flax oil a day experienced fewer and less severe respiratory infections and fewer days of being absent from school. The omega 3 fatty acids in flax oil and fatty fish (such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel) act as immune boosters by increasing the activity of phagocytes, the white blood cells that eat up bacteria.

Remember before you take any supplements or vitamins please consult with your doctor for any possible side affects or issues with any prescription medications you may be taking currently.

 

Stress-Busting Foods

Stress: We all have it, and how we handle it can make all the difference. Stress management can be a powerful tool for wellness, since too much stress can affect physical health. There are many strategies, and one of them is all about what you eat. Read on to learn how a stress management diet can help.

 

Stress-Busting Foods: How They Work

Foods can help tame stress in several ways. Comfort foods, like a bowl of warm oatmeal, boost levels of serotonin, a calming brain chemical. Other foods can cut levels of cortisol and adrenaline, stress hormones that take a toll on the body over time. And a healthy diet can counter the impact of stress, by shoring up the immune system and lowering blood pressure. Do you know which foods are stress busters?

 

Complex Carbs

 

All carbs prompt the brain to make more serotonin. For a steady supply of this feel-good chemical, it’s best to eat complex carbs, which are digested more slowly. Good choices include whole-grain breakfast cereals, breads, and pastas, as well as old-fashioned oatmeal. Complex carbs can also help you feel balanced by stabilizing blood sugar levels.

 

Simple Carbs

 

Dieticians usually recommend steering clear of simple carbs, which include sweets and soda. But in a pinch, these foods can hit the spot. Simple sugars are digested quickly, leading to a spike in serotonin. Still, it doesn’t last long, and there are healthier options. So don’t make these a stress-relieving habit; you should limit these.

 

Oranges

 

Oranges make the list for their wealth of vitamin C. Studies suggest this vitamin can curb levels of stress hormones while strengthening the immune system. In one study of people with high blood pressure, blood pressure and cortisol levels (a stress hormone) returned to normal more quickly when people took vitamin C before a stressful task.

 

Spinach

 

Popeye never lets stress get the best of him — maybe it’s all the magnesium in his spinach. Too little magnesium may trigger headaches and fatigue, compounding the effects of stress. One cup of spinach goes a long way toward replenishing magnesium stores. Not a spinach eater? Try some cooked soybeans or a filet of salmon, also high in magnesium. Green leafy vegetables are a rich source of magnesium.

 

Black Tea

 

Drinking black tea may help you recover from stressful events more quickly. One study compared people who drank four cups of tea daily for six weeks with people who drank another beverage. The tea drinkers reported feeling calmer and had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol after stressful situations. When it comes to stress, the caffeine in coffee can boost stress hormones and raise blood pressure.

 

Almonds

 

Almonds are chock-full of helpful vitamins: vitamin E to bolster the immune system, plus B vitamins, which may make you more resilient during bouts of stress such as depression. To get the benefits, snack on a quarter of a cup every day.

 

Raw Veggies

 

Crunchy raw vegetables can help ease stress in a purely mechanical way. Munching celery or carrot sticks helps release a clenched jaw, and that can ward off tension

 

De-Stress With Exercise

 

Besides changing your diet, one of the best stress-busting strategies is to start exercising. Aerobic exercise boosts oxygen circulation and spurs your body to make feel-good chemicals called endorphins. Aim for 30 minutes of aerobic exercise three to four times a week. If you’re not active now, tell your health care provider you’re going to start exercising — they’ll root for you and make sure you’re ready to get moving.

Packed Food: Healthy or Unhealthy

From idlis, dosas, pav bhaji, aaloo chole, navratan korma and vegetable biryani to chicken curry—grocery stores and supermarkets are full of packed foods. Store-owners say that the sale of such items, also known as convenience food, has increased considerably over the past few years. But how healthy are they?

 

Dr Rekha Sharma, former president of the Indian Dietetic Association, says having such food is convenient but it is not at all healthy. “Ready-to-eat meals are full of salt, trans-fat and colours, which can cause problems related to blood pressure, heart and kidneys. Overdependence on such food items, particularly among youngsters and working couples, can prove disastrous,” she said.

 

According to Swati Bhardwaj, senior research officer at Diabetes Foundation of India, packaged consumer foods use high salt and fat content for long-term preservation. She added that the preservatives make the food unfit for consumption specifically for a population heading towards non-communicable diseases (obesity, diabetes, heart diseases). “If one has to have such meals, it is better to opt for foods which have a lower fat content and contain fewer calories. Steamed, baked, roasted items usually have a lower fat content than fried foods. Adding green salad and fruits to the menu can also help,” she said.

 

Excess salt, a major component and preservative used in ready-to-eat-meals, is a known cause of high blood pressure. It is the cause for 57% of heart attacks and 40% of stroke cases, says the World Health Organization. “A small amount of salt on a daily basis—WHO recommends less than 5 grams per day per person—is essential for nerve and muscle function. But in India people consume eight to nine grams of salt daily,” a senior health official said.

 

Use of phosphate as food additive and preservative is another concern. Nutritionists say phosphate occurs naturally in the form of organic esters in many foods including meat, potatoes and bread. “Natural phosphate is organically bound and only 40% to 60% of it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. But the additive phosphate, which is not organically bound, is very effectively absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract thus causing health problems,” said a senior doctor.

 

“Food additives, colors, preservatives and environmental pollution are likely to be contributory factors for kidney diseases especially in young persons with unexplained kidney failure,” said Dr R P Mathur, senior consultant and head of the department of nephrology and renal transplant services at the Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Vasant Kunj.

FIBER: Importance & Benefits

For one to stay healthy, proper diet and regular exercise is very important. According to the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), as we grow older, it becomes necessary to consume a diet which is rich in fiber and low in carbohydrates, and this consists of about 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day.

What Is Fiber?

Fiber is also known as roughage. It is the indigestible part of plant foods that pushes through our digestive system, absorbing water along the way and easing bowel movements.

The word fiber (North American) can also be spelled fibre (British). It comes from the Latin word fibra, meaning fiber, thread, string, filament, entrails. Dietary fiber refers to nutrients in the diet that are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes.

Fiber is found in all plant foods, like vegetables and fruits as well as in legumes and whole grains. This complex food element is not absorbed or digested completely like most other food, and passes through the digestive tract mostly as a whole. This way of digesting helps in the movement of stool and harmful carcinogens from the body.

Types of Fiber

A fiber-rich diet must include both types of fiber – soluble and insoluble.

Soluble Fiber – Soluble fiber dissolves in water. It changes as it goes through the digestive tract, where it is fermented by bacteria. As it absorbs water it becomes gelatinous. The food rich in soluble fiber are oats, oat bran, legumes, and fruits. These dissolve with water in the body and form a gel like substance that helps in lowering the cholesterol and glucose level.

Insoluble Fiber – Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. As it goes through the digestive tract it does not change its form. Food like whole wheat bran, wheat, rye, sprouts, and nuts are rich in insoluble fiber. Intake of these aid in moving waste from the body through the digestive tract as these fibers absorb water and form a bulk which moves quickly.

Benefits

A high fiber diet has no calories and helps in weight loss (as it gives a feeling of fullness and helps in eating less), fights constipation, and regulates digestive disorders. Low fiber diet increases the risk of colon cancer and heart ailments.

Benefits of soluble fiber:

It reduces cholesterol, especially levels of LDL (bad cholesterol) It regulates sugar intake, this is especially useful for people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Food sources of soluble fiber include: kidney beans, pinto beans, brussels sprouts, broccoli, spinach, zucchini, apples, oranges, grapefruit, grapes, prunes, oatmeal, and whole-wheat bread.

Benefits of insoluble fiber:

Promotes regular bowel movements and prevents constipation Speeds up the elimination of toxic waste through the colon By keeping an optimal pH in the intestines, insoluble fiber helps prevent microbes from producing substances which can lead to colorectal cancer Food sources of insoluble fiber include: vegetables – especially dark green leafy ones, root vegetable skins, fruit skins, whole wheat products, wheat bran, corn bran, nuts, and seeds.

It is important to note that a balanced diet should consist of all food forms. One must not eliminate other food to consume high fiber diet. Just make sure that your diet has good fiber as it will reduce the risk of ailments like cancer, diabetes, and gastrointestinal problems, and also help in losing weight.