गरम पानी पीने के फायदे

सफाई और शुद्धी– यह शरीर को अंदर से साफ करता है। अगर आपका पाचन तंत्र सही नहीं रहता है, तो आपको दिन में दो बार गरम पानी पीना चाहिये। सुबह गरम पानी पीने से शरीर के सारे विशैले तत्‍व बाहर निकल जाते हैं, जिससे पूरा सिस्‍टम साफ हो जाता है। नींबू और शहद डालने से बड़ा फायदा होता है।

 

कब्‍ज दूर करे– शरीर में पानी की कमी हो जाने की वजह से कब्‍ज की समस्‍या पैदा हो जाती है। रोजाना एक ग्‍लास सुबह गरम पानी पीने से फूड पार्टिकल्‍स टूट जाएंगे और आसानी से मल बन निकल जाएंगे। 

मोटापा कम करे– सुबह के समय या फिर हर भोजन के बाद एक ग्‍लास गरम पानी में नींबू और शहद मिला कर पीने से चर्बी कम होती है। नींबू मे पेकटिन फाइबर होते हैं जो बार-बार भूख लगने से रोकते हैं।

सर्दी और जुखाम के लिये– अगर गले में दर्द या फिर टॉन्‍सिल हो गया हो, तो गरम पानी पीजिये। गरम पानी में हल्‍का सा सेंधा नमक मिला कर पीने से लाभ मिलता है।

खूब पसीना बहाए– जब भी आप कोई गरम चीज़ खाते या पीते हैं, तो बहुत पसीना निकलता है। ऐसा तब होता है जब शरीर का टम्‍परेचर बढ जाता है और पिया गया पानी उसे ठंडा करता है, तभी पसीना निकलता है। पसीने से त्‍वचा से नमक बाहर निकलता है और शरीर की अशुद्धी दूर होती है।

शरीर का दर्द दूर करे– मासकि शुरु होने के दिनो में पेट में दर्द होता है, तब गरम पानी में इलायची पाउडर डाल कर पिएं। इससे ना केवल मासिक का दर्द बल्कि शरीर, पेट और सिरदर्द भी सही हो जाता है।

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Shocking but True: ASSOCHAM Survey 2013 – 85% Employees Unhealthy

Due to demanding schedules, high stress levels and performance linked perquisites in private sectors, nearly 85% of employees in private sectors are afflicted to life-style, chronic diseases and acute ailment than the government employees ranging below 8%, according to a recent survey conducted by ASSOCHAM on the occasion of ‘World Health day’.

ASSOCHAM’S survey reveals that 42% identified themselves are afflicted to lifestyle disease, followed by 38% suffering from chronic disease and remaining 15% have an acute ailment in the private sector.

 While releasing the ASSOCHAM survey on “Government vs. Private employee health scenario”, Mr. D S Rawat, Secretary General ASSOCHAM said, there is due compensation for increased inflation by way of dearness allowance (DA) to government employees whereas, the private sector is by and large out of this facility.”

Employees in private sectors are afflicted to life-style, chronic diseases, acute ailment are:

The findings on the government employees reveal very positive features ranging from reasonably good health, family stability, cordial relationship etc, adds the survey. The survey further points out there are many schemes in healthcare for government employees in addition to pension which reflects better health standards in government jobs.

Around 55 %of the survey respondents fall under the age bracket of 20-29 years, followed by 30-39 years (26 per cent), 40-49 years (16 per cent), 50-59 years (2 per cent) and 60-69 years (approximately 1 per cent).

The report included the major cities like Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Ahmedabad, Hyderabd, Pune, Chandigarh, Dehradun etc. A little over 200 employee were selected from each city on an average. Mumbai ranks first afflicted to high levels of stress in private sector followed by Delhi (2nd), Ahemdabad (3rd) Chandigarh (4th), Hyderabad (5th ), Kolkata (6th ) and Chennai (7th) etc.

The survey was able to target private employees from 18 broad sectors, with maximum share contributed by employees from IT/ITes sector (17 per cent).

*Others include employees from those sectors that have contributed >= 1 %share in the survey (consumer durable, construction, energy, healthcare, steel, HR and Misc)

Employees working in engineering and telecom sector contributed 9% and 8% respectively in the questionnaire. Nearly 6% of the employees belonged from market research/KPO and media background each. Management, FMCG and Infrastructure sector employees share is 5% each, in the total survey. Respondents from power and real estate sector contributed 4% each. Employees from education and food& beverages sector provided a share of 3% each. Advertising, manufacturing and textiles employees offered a share of 2% each in the survey results.

“Rising cases of marital disputes and aberrated relationship contributing to high level of stress as reflected in increased serious health problems”, adds Dr. B K Rao, Chairman of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital and ASSOCHAM Health Committee.

The increasingly demanding schedules and high stress levels are leading to sleep disorders in private sector. Loss of sleep has wide ranging effects including daytime fatigue, physical discomfort, psychological stress, performance deterioration, low pain threshold and increase absenteeism. The survey further points out that nearly 45% of the corporate employees in private sector sleep less than 6 hours on a daily basis due to work related pressure.

Around 58% of corporate employees in private sector are deeply concerned about their future health, 38% are most of the time fearful regarding their future health conditions and rest 4% are not at all fearful about their future health, adds the ASSOCHAM Survey.

According to the survey, only 10% employees in private sector have medical insurance, and much of it is inadequate. Nearly all private health service providers require families to spend out-of-pocket at the point of service. This leaves people, highly vulnerable. “Without adequate financial support from the private organization, health remains a major cause of financial insecurity”, adds Mr. Rawat.

In terms of the physical fitness, it was found that around 57% of the employees in the private organization said they ‘do not exercise at all’, 23% do physical workout devoting less than 1 hour/week, 12 %of the employees exercise for 1-3 hours/week, 8% of employees exercise for 3-6 hours/week and merely 7% stay fit by exercising for more than 6 hours/week. The majority of the government employee said that they ‘do exercise’ and physical workout to stay fit by exercising for more than 8 hours/week.

Work related stress can be defined as any level of mental or physical strain that is gained due to pressures in the profession. Work stress is given much impetus since it directly affects the private sectors, adds Mr. Rawat. 

For details:

http://www.assocham.org/prels/shownews.php?id=3957

Stress-Busting Foods

Stress: We all have it, and how we handle it can make all the difference. Stress management can be a powerful tool for wellness, since too much stress can affect physical health. There are many strategies, and one of them is all about what you eat. Read on to learn how a stress management diet can help.

 

Stress-Busting Foods: How They Work

Foods can help tame stress in several ways. Comfort foods, like a bowl of warm oatmeal, boost levels of serotonin, a calming brain chemical. Other foods can cut levels of cortisol and adrenaline, stress hormones that take a toll on the body over time. And a healthy diet can counter the impact of stress, by shoring up the immune system and lowering blood pressure. Do you know which foods are stress busters?

 

Complex Carbs

 

All carbs prompt the brain to make more serotonin. For a steady supply of this feel-good chemical, it’s best to eat complex carbs, which are digested more slowly. Good choices include whole-grain breakfast cereals, breads, and pastas, as well as old-fashioned oatmeal. Complex carbs can also help you feel balanced by stabilizing blood sugar levels.

 

Simple Carbs

 

Dieticians usually recommend steering clear of simple carbs, which include sweets and soda. But in a pinch, these foods can hit the spot. Simple sugars are digested quickly, leading to a spike in serotonin. Still, it doesn’t last long, and there are healthier options. So don’t make these a stress-relieving habit; you should limit these.

 

Oranges

 

Oranges make the list for their wealth of vitamin C. Studies suggest this vitamin can curb levels of stress hormones while strengthening the immune system. In one study of people with high blood pressure, blood pressure and cortisol levels (a stress hormone) returned to normal more quickly when people took vitamin C before a stressful task.

 

Spinach

 

Popeye never lets stress get the best of him — maybe it’s all the magnesium in his spinach. Too little magnesium may trigger headaches and fatigue, compounding the effects of stress. One cup of spinach goes a long way toward replenishing magnesium stores. Not a spinach eater? Try some cooked soybeans or a filet of salmon, also high in magnesium. Green leafy vegetables are a rich source of magnesium.

 

Black Tea

 

Drinking black tea may help you recover from stressful events more quickly. One study compared people who drank four cups of tea daily for six weeks with people who drank another beverage. The tea drinkers reported feeling calmer and had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol after stressful situations. When it comes to stress, the caffeine in coffee can boost stress hormones and raise blood pressure.

 

Almonds

 

Almonds are chock-full of helpful vitamins: vitamin E to bolster the immune system, plus B vitamins, which may make you more resilient during bouts of stress such as depression. To get the benefits, snack on a quarter of a cup every day.

 

Raw Veggies

 

Crunchy raw vegetables can help ease stress in a purely mechanical way. Munching celery or carrot sticks helps release a clenched jaw, and that can ward off tension

 

De-Stress With Exercise

 

Besides changing your diet, one of the best stress-busting strategies is to start exercising. Aerobic exercise boosts oxygen circulation and spurs your body to make feel-good chemicals called endorphins. Aim for 30 minutes of aerobic exercise three to four times a week. If you’re not active now, tell your health care provider you’re going to start exercising — they’ll root for you and make sure you’re ready to get moving.

Packed Food: Healthy or Unhealthy

From idlis, dosas, pav bhaji, aaloo chole, navratan korma and vegetable biryani to chicken curry—grocery stores and supermarkets are full of packed foods. Store-owners say that the sale of such items, also known as convenience food, has increased considerably over the past few years. But how healthy are they?

 

Dr Rekha Sharma, former president of the Indian Dietetic Association, says having such food is convenient but it is not at all healthy. “Ready-to-eat meals are full of salt, trans-fat and colours, which can cause problems related to blood pressure, heart and kidneys. Overdependence on such food items, particularly among youngsters and working couples, can prove disastrous,” she said.

 

According to Swati Bhardwaj, senior research officer at Diabetes Foundation of India, packaged consumer foods use high salt and fat content for long-term preservation. She added that the preservatives make the food unfit for consumption specifically for a population heading towards non-communicable diseases (obesity, diabetes, heart diseases). “If one has to have such meals, it is better to opt for foods which have a lower fat content and contain fewer calories. Steamed, baked, roasted items usually have a lower fat content than fried foods. Adding green salad and fruits to the menu can also help,” she said.

 

Excess salt, a major component and preservative used in ready-to-eat-meals, is a known cause of high blood pressure. It is the cause for 57% of heart attacks and 40% of stroke cases, says the World Health Organization. “A small amount of salt on a daily basis—WHO recommends less than 5 grams per day per person—is essential for nerve and muscle function. But in India people consume eight to nine grams of salt daily,” a senior health official said.

 

Use of phosphate as food additive and preservative is another concern. Nutritionists say phosphate occurs naturally in the form of organic esters in many foods including meat, potatoes and bread. “Natural phosphate is organically bound and only 40% to 60% of it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. But the additive phosphate, which is not organically bound, is very effectively absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract thus causing health problems,” said a senior doctor.

 

“Food additives, colors, preservatives and environmental pollution are likely to be contributory factors for kidney diseases especially in young persons with unexplained kidney failure,” said Dr R P Mathur, senior consultant and head of the department of nephrology and renal transplant services at the Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Vasant Kunj.